Dont Stop Smoking

Smoking is a risk factor for lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic respiratory disease, and other conditions. According to the World Health Organization, smoking is an important and preventable cause of death.

In 2014, 18.1% of Canadians aged 12 and older, roughly 5.4 million people, smoked either daily or occasionally. This is a decrease from 2013 (19.3%) and is the lowest smoking rate reported since 2001. Among the sexes, 21.4% of males and 14.8% of females reported that they smoked daily or occasionally in 2014. For males this was a decrease from 2012 and for females it was a decrease from 2013. The rates of smoking have decreased significantly since 2001 when 28.2% of males and 23.8% of females smoked daily or occasionally.

The majority of smokers, nearly 4.0 million, smoked cigarettes on a daily basis. Daily smokers can be classified as heavy, moderate or light smokers based on how many cigarettes they smoke per day. Light smokers were the most common type of daily smoker (52.7%) followed by moderate (28.9%) and then heavy smokers (18.4%; Chart 2). In 2014, males were more likely to be heavy or moderate smokers than females, while females were more likely to be light smokers than males.

 

Canada 20.8 19.9 20.3 19.3 18.1
Males 24.2 22.3 23.1 22.1 21.4
Females 17.4 17.5 17.5 16.5 14.8
Total Population and Smoking Status Percentages and Counts for Canadians Aged 15 Years Older From 1999 and 2012
CTUMS Annual 2012 1999 2012
Population Percentage Population Percentage
Current Smoker – Includes daily smokers and non-daily smokers.
Former Smoker – Person who is not smoking; however, has smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their life.
Ever Smoker – Current and former smoker combined.
Never Smoker – Person who is not smoking and has not smoked 100 cigarettes in their life.
Never Smoker + Ever Smoker = Total Population

 

Passive smoking,’ or exposure to second-hand smoke, has negative respiratory health effects. Two of the most common diseases associated with breathing-in second-hand smoke are lung cancer in adults and asthma among children.

The proportion of non-smokers aged 12 and older who were regularly exposed to second-hand smoke at home was 3.9% in 2014, a decrease from 4.5% in 2013. This rate has declined significantly since 2003 when it was 10.6%. The rate of exposure to second hand smoke at home was higher for males (4.3%) than females (3.5%) in 2014.

In 2014, 9.2% of young Canadians aged 12 to 19 were exposed to second-hand smoke at home—a decrease from 23.4% in 2003. This age group is the most likely to be exposed to second hand smoke at home. Of the almost one million non-smoking Canadians aged 12 and over who were regularly exposed to second-hand smoke at home, the 12 to 19 age group accounted for 27.9%.

Smoking can be pointed at as a contributor to the Top 3 Causes of Death in Canada.

Ranking, number and percentage of deaths for the 10 leading causes of death, Canada, 2000, 2011 and 2012 Table summary
This table displays the results of Ranking. The information is grouped by Cause of death (appearing as row headers), 2012, 2011 and 2000, calculated using rank, number and % units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Cause of death 2012 2011 2000
rank number % rank number % rank number %
All causes of death Note : not applicable 246,596 100.0 Note : not applicable 243,511 100.0 Note : not applicable 218,062 100.0
Total, 10 leading causes of death Note : not applicable 184,869 75.0 Note : not applicable 182,795 75.1 Note : not applicable 175,149 80.3
Malignant neoplasms (cancer) 1 74,361 30.2 1 72,736 29.9 1 62,672 28.7
Diseases of heart (heart disease) 2 48,681 19.7 2 47,911 19.7 2 55,070 25.3
Cerebrovascular diseases (stroke) 3 13,174 5.3 3 13,332 5.5 3 15,576 7.1